Dinner 12/9/2022

Ribeye steak, baked potato, sauteed asparagus

Friday night was steak night. I had a rather frustrating work day trying to fix an issue with one of our VPNs, so by the end of the day, I was not in the mood for anything challenging to cook. Luckily, I had thought to defrost a steak a couple of days earlier. Say what you will about meat-and-potatoes, but it’s easy and satisfying, and I was in a much better frame of mind after dsinner than I was before dinner.

I have tried many different ways to cook a steak, but lately I am using the method espoused by Sam The Cooking Guy, which is simply to flip the steak every couple of minutes for 8-10 minutes (depending on your desired level of doneness). I like my steak on the red side of medium-rare, so I aim for the lower end of that time. I use a cast iron skillet heated until the first wisps of smoke start to appear. Lightly oil the steak with a little avocado oil, sprinkle with Kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper. I prefer to have NY strip sirloin, but ribeye was what I had in the freezer. I think ribeye is better on the grill.

Dinner 8/2/22

NY Strip steak with peppers and onions, baked potato

I have tried most of the preparation methods people suggest for steak – grilling, pan-frying, sous vide, reverse sear – and for my money I still get the best results in my cast-iron skillet. Four minutes a side, flipping every two minutes, with a four-minute rest produces a medium-rare steak and lagely escapes the “gray ring” of overcooked outer meat. I picked up the two-minute flip technique from Sam The Cooking Guy on YouTube. You do have to have the pan pretty hot to get a good Maillard reaction in the short surface time, and using a high-smokepoint oil like avocado oil is a good idea.

I think New York strip is my favorite cut, even though I think ribeye tastes better. The extra fat on a ribeye is great for flavor, but it makes the steak a little greasy.

For this steak, I first sauteed up some sliced onion and green bell pepper in a small amount of bacon fat in the cast-iron skillet. The vegetables took up almost all the bacon fat, so there wasn’t any left over to burn in the pan. I put a smidge of avocado oil on the steak itself, along with salt and pepper, and used the same pan. The steak,smothered with the onions and peppers, was fantastic.

For baked potatoes, I usually follow America’s Test Kitchen’s method of dunking the potatoes in salted water before baking, but this time I only lightly brushed the potato with avocado oil. Both methods result in a super crispy skin after roasting at 450 degrees for one hour.